Evi-Med

Constructing an evidence base of contemporary Mediterranean migrations


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Welcome to EVI-MED

“EVI-MED – Constructing an evidence base of contemporary Mediterranean migrations” seeks to conduct urgent data collection and essential analysis on the Mediterranean migration crisis and to make these swiftly and publicly available to policymakers, practitioners, migrant community support organisations, and the research community.

This ESRC-funded research project is lead by Middlesex University with the support of national, international and local partners. For further information read the ‘about’ page.


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IMISCOE Spring Conference 2017

The 2017 edition of the IMISCOE Spring conference will take place at Middlesex University on 17 February 2017. The extensive programme includes a presentation (by A. D’Angelo and E. Tozzi) of preliminary results of the EVI-MED survey with over 700 recently arrived migrants in the reception systems across the Mediterranean.
For information about the conference visit: https://mdxmigration.wordpress.com


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Frontiere, Accoglienza e Diritti

Universita’ degli Studi di Palermo, 5/7/2016

 Frontiere Accoglienza e Diritti – Operatori, giuristi e ricercatori a confronto
(Frontiers, Reception and Rights – Knowledge Exchange event for practitioners, lawyers and researchers – EVI-MED Event – In Italian)

Questa giornata di lavoro e dialogo è promossa nell’ambito del progetto internazionale di ricerca ‘EVI-MED’ condotto dalla Middlesex University di Londra in collaborazione con Borderline Sicilia e l’Università degli Studi di Palermo – Clinica Legale per i Diritti Umani.

L’evento è aperto a tutti, ma si richiede la registrazione online.

Per informazioni ed iscrizioni clicca qui.


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Refugee reception and humanitarian protection in Greece and Italy: evidence from the ground

June 22nd, Thessaloniki, Greece

“EVI-MED – Constructing an evidence base of contemporary Mediterranean migrations” seeks to conduct data collection  of migrant flows and experiences of the reception system  and essential analysis on the Mediterranean migration crisis and to make these swiftly and publicly available to policymakers, practitioners, migrant community support organisations, and the research community”

This seminar presents initial results from the EVI-MED project after the first wave of surveys in Greece and Italy and seeks to situate it within the wider context of asylum policy, humanitarian assistance and the reception system in Greece.

To see the full programme and to book a place, visit the EventBrite page.


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Refugee reception and humanitarian protection in Greece and Italy: evidence from the ground

June 22nd, Thessaloniki, Greece

“EVI-MED – Constructing an evidence base of contemporary Mediterranean migrations” seeks to conduct data collection  of migrant flows and experiences of the reception system  and essential analysis on the Mediterranean migration crisis and to make these swiftly and publicly available to policymakers, practitioners, migrant community support organisations, and the research community”

This seminar presents initial results from the EVI-MED project after the first wave of surveys in Greece and Italy and seeks to situate it within the wider context of asylum policy, humanitarian assistance and the reception system in Greece.

To see the full programme and to book a place, visit the EventBrite page.


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Remembering the Refugee Crisis

Twelve months on from one of the deadliest shipwrecks in modern times, we need to re-think the role memory should play when dealing with the ‘refugee crisis’.

Almost exactly a year ago, on the night of 18/19 April 2015, over 800 migrants died in the Mediterranean’s worst shipwreck of modern times. An Egyptian-flagged boat was travelling between the north of Libya and the Italian island of Lampedusa when it launched a distress call. Tragically, the boat capsized after colliding with the Portuguese merchant ship which had come to its rescue. Many of the people on board, mainly African and Bangladeshi migrants, and including young children, were locked in the hull. Only 28 young men survived and just 58 bodies were recovered – all the others are still technically ‘missing’, most unnamed. Operations to recover and try to identify them will start only this month, as recently confirmed by the Italian government.

As the anniversary of the disaster approaches, it is important to remember the people who lost their lives that night, and with them all the others who died and went missing at sea over recent weeks, months and years trying to reach Europe.

Continue reading Alessio D’Angelo’s latest blog on Middlesex Minds.

MigrantsLampedusa